Taking the ASVAB

Whether a young individual seeks enlistment in the U. S. Army, the U. S. Air Force, the U. S. Marines Corps, the U. S Coast Guard, the U. S. National Guard or the U. S. Navy, he or she will have to sit for the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery or ASVAB test. The ASVAB consists of a written section and a multiple question format section. Both sections are comprised of questions related to ten different subject areas. These subject areas are (1) General Science, (2) Arithmetic Reasoning, (3) Word Knowledge, (4) Paragraph Comprehension, (5) Mathematics Knowledge, (6) Electronics Information, (7) Automotive and Shop Information, (8) Mechanical Comprehension, (9) Assembling Objects and finally (10) Verbal Expression.

The best way for a candidate for enlistment in the U. S. Armed Services to prepare for the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is to take an ASVAB practice test. Not only does taking multiple versions of an ASVAB test help to familiarize the candidate for enlistment with the test format but it also helps the candidate for enlistment better discern the specific subject areas that he or she may lack sufficient knowledge and therefore would require more focused attention.

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery serves two distinct purposes. The first purpose served by the ASVAB is that it assesses the candidate’s qualifications for enlistment. Although it is not a particularly high bar for most young people to achieve, some people do in fact lack these qualities and are therefore not qualified to serve in the U. S. Armed Services regardless of the branch. The second purpose served by the ASVAB is that it assesses the candidate’s individual skill set in order to best match that candidate (assuming he or she passes the exam) with an appropriate occupation within the U. S. Armed Services. The bottom line is that it is important the candidate perform well on the ASVAB and the way to do that is to prepare by taking multiple versions of the ASVAB practice test.